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1777

Vermont declares itself an independent state.

1785
Lucy Terry Prince, former slave, appears before The VT Governor and Council to defend in person her  family’s title to property in Guilford.

1791
Vermont admitted to Union as 14th state.

1811
Mary Palmer Tyler publishes The Maternal Physician, one of the earliest childcare manuals in the US.

1814
Emma Willard opens Middlebury Female Seminary.

1819
Emma Willard publishes Plan for Improving Female Education.

1835
420 women sign antislavery petition in Starksboro and send it to Congress.

1836-37
Many women petition the VT Legislature to prohibit the sale of alcohol.

1847
VT Legislature grants married women the right to make wills and some control over their inherited personal property.

1852
Clarina Howard Nichols becomes first woman to address the VT Legislature. She asks for, and is denied, school suffrage for women.

1867
Legislature grants married women control over their inherited personal property.

1869
Council of Censors proposes woman suffrage amendment to the VT Constitution.

1870

1871
UVM admits first female students.

1875

1880
Tax-paying women obtain right to vote in school meetings.

1882
WCTU lobbies successfully for first state temperance education law enacted in US.

1883
Middlebury College admits first female students.

1884

1886
Legislature grants married women the right to control their own earnings.

1896
VT Federation of Women's Clubs founded.

1899
Mary Annette Anderson of Shoreham, first Vermont African-American woman to earn a college  degree, as a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Middlebury College, also class valedictorian.