Miranda Brainerd Stranahan

The Warner House is the earliest extant brick urban mansion in New England, built 1716-1718.
The Warner House is the earliest extant brick urban mansion in New England, built 1716-1718.

Time Period

1860-1910

Notable Facts

State Regent of the Daughters of the American Revolution from 1903-1907. Vice-President and President of the Vermont Society of Colonial Dames. President of the Needlework Guild. Served on the Board of the Warner House.

Personal Information

Date of Birth

12/12/1841

Date of Death

12/17/1909

Primary Residence

St. Albans

Historical Significance

Born Miranda Aldis Brainerd, Miranda Stranahan was a charter member of the Bellevue Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR)in 1886. She was descended from Captain David Smith. From 1902 to 1903 she was Regent of that chapter. She went on to serve as State Regent of DAR from 1903 to 1907.

Brainerd served as the third Vice-President of the Vermont Society of Colonial Dames, and later became President of that organization.

She was President of the Needlework Guild. She was active in the Daughters of 1812, and the Descendants of the Mayflower.

Brainerd also served on the Board of the Warner House, now a National Historic Landmark in Portsmouth, NH.

On August 26, 1862 she was married to Farrand Stewart Stranahan, a Civil War veteran and Vermont politician. They had two children.

Organizations or Movements

  • Daughters of the American Revolution
  • Needlework Guild
  • Daughters of 1812
  • Descendants of the Mayflower
  • Vermont Society of Colonial Dames
  • Warner House

Occupations

  • Community leader

Education

  • Attended high school in Brattleboro

Additional Information (Bibliography)

  • warner house image Link

  • St. Albans, Franklin County Driving Tour Link